Jackson Pollock, Untitled (M9), 1944. Courtesy Washburn Gallery, New York. © Pollock-Krasner Foundation/ARS

OVERVIEW

For more than three decades, the Pollock-Krasner Foundation has supported working artists internationally. Established in 1985 though the generosity of Lee Krasner-one of the foremost abstract expressionist painters of the 20th century, the Foundation is a leader in providing resources to emerging and established artists. To date, the Pollock-Krasner Foundation has awarded nearly 5,000 grants to professional artists and organizations in 78 countries, for a total of $79 million.

Through its individual artist grants, the Foundation provides financial resources for artists to create new work, acquire supplies, rent studio space, prepare exhibitions, attend a residency and offset living expenses, allowing them to better pursue their art. The Foundation also provides grants to organizations that directly engage with artists, such as museums and galleries by funding exhibitions and artist residency programs. The Foundation also supports exhibitions and scholarship about Krasner and Pollock artwork.

The Foundation also recognizes artistic excellence through two special awards, the Lee Krasner Award and the Pollock Prize for Creativity. Lee Krasner Awards are given in recognition of lifetime artistic achievement. In 2016, the Foundation launched the Pollock Prize for Creativity awarded to an outstanding artist whose work embodies high creative standards and exemplifies the impact of art on individuals and society.

POLLOCK-KRASNER LEGACY

Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner in Pollock's studio, East Hampton, 1950.

<span>Photograph by Rudolph Burckhardt. ©Estate of Rudolph Burckhardt, courtesy Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, East Hampton, NY.</span>
Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner in Pollock's studio, East Hampton, 1950. Photograph by Rudolph Burckhardt. ©Estate of Rudolph Burckhardt, courtesy Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, East Hampton, NY.

Both artists finished their training just as the Great Depression of the 1930s was devastating the U.S. economy. Millions of people were out of work, and the prospects for young unknown artists were dim. Fortunately Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal administration created employment programs that included workers in the arts, and both Pollock and Krasner took advantage of them. From 1935 to 1943, the Works Progress Administration (WPA) Federal Art Project gave them, and thousands of other artists nationwide, a living wage to do the work for which they were trained. The agency’s non-discriminatory hiring policy was based on artistic merit and financial need. Freed from the demands of the commercial art market, artists made murals, easel paintings, and other works for public buildings. And they experimented with new approaches, paving the way for Abstract Expressionism’s emergence after World War II.

Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock on their Springs property, ca. 1946. <span> Photograph by Ronald J. Stein. © Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, East Hampton, NY. Gift of the Estate of Ronald J. Stein. </span>
Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock on their Springs property, ca. 1946. Photograph by Ronald J. Stein. © Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, East Hampton, NY. Gift of the Estate of Ronald J. Stein.
Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner in Pollock's studio, East Hampton, 1949. <span> Photograph by Lawrence Larkin. © Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, East Hampton, NY. Used by permission. </span>
Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner in Pollock's studio, East Hampton, 1949. Photograph by Lawrence Larkin. © Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, East Hampton, NY. Used by permission.

Lee Krasner never forgot the personal and professional advantages she and Pollock received on the WPA, and was mindful of the lack of such opportunities in the contemporary art world. In planning her legacy, she envisioned a charitable organization that would serve a similar function: to relieve the financial burden on recognized professional artists so they can practice and advance their work. Her prudent management of Pollock’s estate, as well as her own successful career, provided the initial funding to make that vision a reality.

-Helen Harrison, Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Director, Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, East Hampton, NY

Lee Krasner, <em>Mural Study for Studio A</em> Radio Station NYC, 1941.    
<span>Gouache on paper, 19 1/2 x 29 in. Courtesy Kasmin Gallery, © Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.</span>
Lee Krasner, Mural Study for Studio A Radio Station NYC, 1941. Gouache on paper, 19 1/2 x 29 in. Courtesy Kasmin Gallery, © Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Jackson Pollock <em>untitled</em>, ca. 1938-41. 
<span>Glass mosaic in cement on wooden support, 54 x 24 in. Courtesy Washburn Gallery 
© Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.</span>
Jackson Pollock untitled, ca. 1938-41. Glass mosaic in cement on wooden support, 54 x 24 in. Courtesy Washburn Gallery 
© Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

LEADERSHIP

OFFICERS

Ronald D. Spencer
Chairman & CEO
Samuel Sachs II
President
Kerrie Buitrago
Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer
Caroline Black
Program Director

STAFF

Beth Cochems
Grants Manager
Glynnis Dolbee
Inventory Manager
Jennifer Gillett
Office Manager

ADVISORS

Robert Hobbs
Carter Ratcliff

These countries include:

Argentina
Armenia
Australia
Austria
Bangladesh
Belarus
Belgium
Bolivia
Brazil
Bulgaria
Burkina Faso
Canada
Chile
China
Colombia
Costa Rica
Croatia
Cuba
Czech Republic
Denmark
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
Egypt
England
Ethiopia
Finland
France
Georgia
Germany
Ghana
Greece
Guadeloupe
Guatemala
Hungary
Iceland
India
Indonesia
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Japan
Kazakhstan
Kenya
Lithuania
Macedonia
Mexico
Mongolia
Namibia
The Netherlands
New Zealand
Norway
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russia
Scotland
Slovak Republic
Slovenia
South Africa
South Korea
Serbia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Thailand
Togo
Trinidad
Turkey
Ukraine
United States
Uruguay
Vietnam
Wales
Yugoslavia (former)
Zimbabwe